I picture my research in Canada

Composite image of six researchers standing side-by-side against different coloured backgrounds

I picture my research in Canada

For a new generation of researchers, Canada is an obvious choice
September 17, 2018

New researchers have options. They are skilled in the latest technologies, fresh with ideas and creativity, and ready with the knowledge and ambition that will transform our world — all of which makes them highly sought-after. They are the bright minds the country needs — to keep or to attract from all corners of the globe — in order to build a future fueled by research and innovation. What sets Canada apart from other countries is the Canada Foundation for Innovation. It supports young researchers with the cutting-edge labs and equipment they need to pursue the compelling research questions that drive them. Very often, that seals the deal in their decision to stay or move here. In this collection, learn how six researchers in the early stages of their career are taking advantage of state-of-the-art research infrastructure to make a real difference.


Supporting early career researchers

Funding for research infrastructure enhances the ability of Canadian academic institutions to attract and retain sought-after researchers at the beginning of their career and helps to position those researchers for success.


  • Christopher Mushquash’s upbringing in Sioux Lookout, an Ontario town about four hours northwest of Thunder Bay, greatly influenced the kind of researcher and clinician he has become. Mushquash is Ojibway, a member of Pays Plat First Nation. Growing up, he held a strong interest in science and mental health, which led him to study psychology at Lakehead University. “When I was an undergraduate student I felt that it would be important for me to develop a skill set that might make me of use to my community,” he says. Mushquash has gone on to do just that, and much more — while always...
  • After completing a master’s degree in naval engineering in her native Iran, Marjan Taghi Boroojerdi was drawn to Newfoundland’s Memorial University for the opportunity to conduct experimental work at the world-famous labs in the Department of Ocean and Naval Architectural Engineering. Now, she studies the bonds that form between chunks of sea ice, as part of a team working to improve the safety of ships and oil rigs in arctic and sub-arctic conditions. Return to the collection...
  • Conventional electronics rely on silicon chips. But many other substances, including inks and dyes, can conduct electricity, making them candidates for a new generation of flexible, printable electronics. In his laboratory at the University of Ottawa, Benoît Lessard and his students work on customizing molecules to optimize their electronic properties, then using those molecules in prototype devices, including lights, sensors and solar panels. Return to the collection...
  • How does a first-year university student’s Facebook feed influence their feelings of social connection and belonging? Can a stressful situation be buffered by smelling the scent of a loved one? What impact does our social media use have on our sleep quality? Those questions — and many more — are being examined inside Frances Chen’s Social Health Lab at the University of British Columbia. Chen’s research explores the intersection of social psychology and health psychology, linking our social lives (and, increasingly, our online social lives), mental health and physical health....
  • Cancer treatments like chemotherapy aren’t perfect. The drugs meant to kill cancerous cells aren’t choosy, so they take out healthy cells too, which can mean serious side-effects for the patient. And if cancer cells develop a resistance, the therapies might not result in a complete remission. Engineering new molecules that incorporate the power of metals to destroy disease-causing cells could not only lead to more effective cancer treatments, but also better defences against another serious health threat — multidrug resistant bacteria. Return to the collection...
  • Raising sandflies is tricky, but with the help of Chukwunonso Nzelu’s expertise, researchers have grown a large, thriving colony of the insects at the University of Calgary’s high-level containment insectarium. It’s a critical resource for studying how the flies transmit Leishmaniasis to humans, with the goal of producing a vaccine against the disease which kills 30 000 people a year. What they learn could also inform the prevention of other insect-borne diseases like Lyme disease and malaria. Return to the collection...