Building tougher ships

Building tougher ships

Novel design tools are helping build ships that can withstand rough Arctic waters, making potential offshore drilling sites more accessible
October 22, 2012

Canada’s Arctic seafloor is said to contain approximately $10 trillion worth of oil and gas reserves, which could inject an estimated $100 trillion into the Canadian economy. But accessing potential offshore drilling areas in the Arctic requires sturdy ships designed to withstand ice flows and extreme weather conditions.

At Memorial University of Newfoundland in St. John’s, naval engineer Claude Daley is conducting the largest experiments in the world involving ships and ice. Specifically, he is creating novel and practical design tools that meet today’s ship-building challenges. Working with industry partners from around the world, his research team is setting international construction standards for ships to safely and affordably travel through frigid Arctic waters.

Both Canadian and American governments rely on Daley’s research to improve ship safety, and his team’s work has improved ship design and building standards for Arctic ship projects for industry partners such as BMT Fleet Technology, Husky Energy and Hyundai Heavy Industries.