Dr. David Strangway Appointed President Of The Canada Foundation For Innovation

April 16, 1998

OTTAWA, April 16, 1998 - Dr. John Evans, Chair of the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI) is pleased to announce the appointment of Dr. David W. Strangway as President and CEO of the Foundation. Dr. Strangway succeeds the CFI's founding President, the late Dr. J. Keith Brimacombe. 

"Dr. Strangway is widely recognized for his leadership, his commitment to excellence, and his contributions to Canadian innovation," said Dr. Evans. "He brings to the position an impressive track record in scientific research and as president of a leading research university. His vision will no doubt help ensure that the CFI contributes to building Canada's capacity for innovation. Dr. Strangway's first priority will be to lead the strategy aimed at strengthening partnership support for our research institutions from the private and voluntary sectors, as well as from governments." 

Dr. Strangway is past President and Vice-chancellor of the University of British Columbia, where he is credited with developing the institution's worldwide reputation for research excellence. He previously worked as a geophysical specialist for the United Nations, the National Aeronautic and Space Administration (NASA), and for a number of leading world companies. Dr. Strangway has served as Chair of the Geology Department at the University of Toronto from 1973 to 1980. He also served as Vice-president and acting President of the University of Toronto from 1980 to 1985, when he accepted the position of President at UBC. 

"Dr. Strangway's vast research experience and his deep understanding of the workings of government and the private sector have made him the best candidate to build the partnerships needed to successfully fulfill the CFI mandate," said Dr. David Pink, Professor of Physics at St. Francis Xavier University, and a member of the Governance and Nominating Committee of the CFI's Board of Directors. 

"Dr. Strangway has demonstrated his ability to understand and support research in a variety of institutions," added Dr. Arthur May, President of Memorial University. "He is in an ideal position to provide the leadership required to ensure the strategic development of research at all Canadian institutions, and to help Canada become a truly innovative society." 

Dr. Strangway will work in close collaboration with Dr. Denis Gagnon who will continue as the CFI's Senior Vice-president. Dr. Strangway's appointment is effective June 1, 1998. 

The CFI is an independent, not-for-profit corporation established in May 1997 with funds from the federal government. Its mandate is to invest in infrastructure for research and development in not-for-profit research institutions. The CFI's initial capital of $800 million is to be committed on research infrastructure projects over the next five years, matched by investments from governments, and the private and voluntary sectors. 


BIOGRAPHY
 
Dr. David W. Strangway 

Dr. Strangway is past President and Vice-chancellor of the University of British Columbia where he played a key role in establishing UBC as an international institution. During his 12-year tenure, Dr. Strangway's vision and commitment to excellence have helped place the university on par with other world-class academic institutions. In 1970, Dr. Strangway joined the National Aeronautic and Space Administration (NASA) as Chief of the Geophysics Branch, where he was responsible for the geophysical aspects of the Apollo missions. In 1973, he resumed his academic career in Canada and served as Chair of the Geology Department at the University of Toronto from 1973 to 1980. Dr. Strangway also served as both Vice-president and acting President of the University of Toronto from 1980 to 1985, when he became President of UBC. Dr. Strangway also has extensive experience outside the academic arena as a geophysical consultant for the United Nations and for some major world companies. Since 1971, Dr. Strangway has worked with more than 50 government, private-sector, and non-governmental organizations, and served on numerous scientific and academic committees, including the British Columbia Premier's Advisory Committee on Science and Technology, the B.C. Task Force on the Environment and the Economy, and the Corporate-Higher Education Forum (Canada). Dr. Strangway has received many honours and awards including the NASA Medal for Exceptional Scientific Achievement (1972), the Izaak Walton Killam Memorial Scholarship (1980), the Logan Gold Medal (1984) of the Geological Association of Canada, and the J. Tuzo Wilson Award (1987) from the Canadian Geophysical Union. And in 1996, Dr. Strangway was made an Officer of the Order of Canada.